Nutritious and Delicious Broth

An early and easy addition for health…

img_20170207_210948-2An early addition to meals in my journey to better health with just a slight change to my routine and…Bam…a big boost to how nutritious and delicious many of our meals became.

I never thought much about broth. Sure I have bought those boxes of ready made in the grocery store, and yes we’ve also served up a can or packet of chicken and noodle soup periodically when there was illness in the house. But when I was diagnosed with low thyroid and started researching how to change what I had control of (and subsequently have a H.U.G.E. impact on my overall health), I really learned about the many benefits of this liquid goodness and realized it needed to be a big part of our regular meals. It even became a daily routine for me when my thyroid numbers were at their worst.

Today I’m talking about bone broth, and while you can make bone broth from beef, lamb, pig and so on, we will focus on chicken broth here. There are slight variations in recipes and ingredients all over the internet, but here you will find the basics of what we do in our household.

“If you have a good quality, homemade bone broth you are getting huge amounts of gelatin, glutamine, glucosamine, minerals…you’re getting all of these very gut healing, joint healing, connective tissue healing nutrients in a way that’s easy to digest that pretty much anybody, no matter how sick they are, can tolerate.” 
Liz Lipski PhD, CCN, CNS, CHN, LDN, CFM

Making broth involves mostly low and slow cooking to extract nutrients, and can provide you with protein, collagen, amino acids, and more that support skin, hair, and nail health, detoxification, energy, tissue repair, and gut, joint and heart health. Generally the longer you cook, the more beneficial you have access. Depending upon the bones you’re using, and what you’re trying to accomplish, cook times can range from a few hours to a few days. Chicken broth is one of the shortest broth cook times and one of the gentlest on those with compromised health.

Bone Broth

  • Time: 10mins Prep/2-12hrs Cook time
  • Print

No gluten, grain, dairy, eggs

Ingredients

  • Chicken Bones from 1-2 pastured chickensimg_20170222_201316
  • Clean, cold water to fill your cooking pot or slow cooker to cover the bones
  • 1 Tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 Onion (ends removed and quartered) Optional
  • 2-3 Cloves of garlic (crushed or quartered) Optional
  • 2-3 Carrots (ends removed, peeled, and quartered) Optional
  • 2 Celery Stalks (ends removed and quartered) Optional
  • Herbs (thyme, rosemary, parsley, sage, and/or bay leaves) Optional


Directions

  1. Place your chicken bones, water, and vinegar in your pot or slow cooker and let sit while you add other ingredients of your choice.
  2. Set your stove or crockpot for low and slowly cook for 2-12 hours.
  3. Skim off and discard any grayish/brownish scum that appears on top while cooking.
  4. Wait until about 1 hour before done to add your herbs.
  5. Serve a portion immediately in a soup, stew, or to add flavor to a side or main dish, or let it cool completely and then refrigerate and serve gradually in your favorite recipes.
  6. Freeze any broth that remains after 4 days after cooking. May I suggest freezing in ice cube trays and then moving to a closed container for easy access in adjustable amounts.


Notes and Recommendations:

  1. You only really need the bones and clean water and a little vinegar, but other vegetables, herbs, and seasonings are often added to increase the nutrient density and depth of flavor.
  2. Consider using all the bones and joint pieces from the chickens in your broth.
  3. If you decide to cook your broth on the stove, be sure to watch and make sure your liquid level stays above the chicken bones.
  4. I use Redmond Real Salt and cracked peppercorns.
  5. I recommend organic, non-GMO veggies, and pasture-raised, bug eating chickens for this recipe. Otherwise check out the “Clean 15” and “Dirty Dozen” lists on Environmental Working Group and resources like Local Harvest are also often helpful for clean sources in your area.

Recipe by Elaine @ www.foodandlivingcoach.com


I usually plan to make broth overnight after serving a chicken dinner, just removing the chicken meat for our meal, throwing the broth ingredients in my slow cooker. I love taking a big breath when I wake up the next morning to the delicious smell of broth. Since we go through it pretty quickly, we usually store it, after cooled, in mason jars in the refrigerator but the frozen broth cubes have worked well too, and allow you to conveniently grab what you need for future meal preparations.

To your Best Health!

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